Archive for the ‘Bird Habitats’ Category

Birds at Omi’s House

Omi's Birds

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California Thrasher

I saw two of these hook-beaked beauties on my walk into Bonelli from Bracket Airfield this morning, one on either side of the road! They were at the tops of their respective trees, letting their voices be heard. I was drawn to pause by the distinct, melodiou, voices of song that they were lifting up in the morning … either praises or love lyrics for the breeding season!

CaliforniaThrasher

Song of the California Thrasher

CaliforniaThrasher2

Birding Bonelli – five new IDs!

Birding in Bonelli by the Puddingstone Reservoir was amazing today! I made five new IDs:  Common Tern, Ring-Necked Duck, Least Sandpiper, Wilson’s Warbler, and on the walk out, the Greater Roadrunner!! I was deeply delighted.

I also saw a number of smaller song-birds:  purple finches, western blue birds, yellow-rumped warblers, black phoebes, mockingbirds, redwing blackbirds, California towhees, a mourning dove as well as several swallows and sparrows. The song sparrow was lovely!

voice of the song sparrow 

As ever, there were Canadian Geese, Mallard Ducks, and Muscovy Ducks galore, and there were greater white-fronted geese with a snow goose for company and plenty of American coots (of course!), but there were fewer herons than usual. I saw two Great White Herons in flight, but I only spotted one snowy egret. The green herons were already in hiding at mid-morning. I saw one cormorant and one common merganser (female). No raptors.

I heard, then saw, a Nuttall’s Woodpecker. Several male and female Great-Tailed Grackles were in pine trees and along the water’s edge. Killdeer were very vocal.

Mallard Hybrids

mallard_hybrids1

I saw two beautiful mallard hybrids,

dark brown with white chests,

at the Marin Civic Center Park in San Rafael last Saturday.

Birding Bonelli in February

It was a beautiful day to get up and go birding in Bonelli Regional Park. I was there by about 7:30 AM with my beloved miniature dachshund, Joyful. Walking in from the airport, I could see white-crowned sparrows and distinctly hear the red-winged blackbirds:  the females are nesting (so unseen), the males are guarding (and so very visible!), and together, they’re singing their highly identifiable song. I noticed the “point man” redwing on a fence. I love the communal nature of redwing blackbirds.

A sweet black phoebe greeted me as I came to the wooded area at the end of the road. Once at Puddingstone reservoir, it was very rewarding to see a flotilla of white pelicans, who were sailing, big-bodied, past slender great white egrets. A black-crowned night heron winged his way over the water and took up residence in a tree branch.

 

WhitePelicans

There were the usual suspects, of course: American coots, Canadian geese, Mallard ducks … later, the Muscovies and Greater-White Fronted Geese. But I saw no Great Blue Herons or Kingfishers. No doves or finches. I was not a little distressed to see someone had plowed under a large patch of a section of reeds where finches and several other birds have their homes.

Nevertheless, it turned out to be a fabulous day for birding:  I saw the sweetest female blue bird in a pine tree … yellow-rumped warblers … a lincoln’s sparrow. A great-tailed grackle went striding through the grass at one point! Brown-headed cowbirds and redwings kept company. Along the shore were killdeer and sanderlings in their breeding plumage. Tree swallows were darting over the water, radiating happiness.

 

On the water were greater and lesser scaups as well as cinnamon teal ducks! At one point, a male cinnamon teal did me the favor of rearing up in the water and flapping his wings so I could see the white under-feathers, confirming his identity. I also saw red-headed ducks. The females were lovely! Scaups, cinnamon teals, and red-headed ducks were all new IDs for me, so very exciting.

 

When I retraced my steps, heading back, I was delighted to see the pelicans and many more great white egrets than I had two or so hours before. An osprey was perched high in a tree, and a raft of common mergansers were swimming and diving together in synchronous harmony. The night heron I saw earlier had been joined by his mate. The green heron had also come out and perched on a branch in the water. Beautiful!

 

Baby Birder on the Beach!

2.19.18 Ocean Park Birdwatching

Birding on a Windy Day

This weekend I headed over to Lompoc to visit my brother, sister-in-law and beloved nephew, Elijah, who is almost two years old. We decided to head out to Ocean Park to go birding at the estuary. Estuaries, where fresh water meets the sea, are good places to see birds of many different kinds within several yards of each other.

On the drive over, we saw a turkey vulture soaring beside the roadway (of course), and as we entered the park, we saw Northern Shovelers fishing in fresh water. When we decided to park and get out of the car, our adventure took a bit of a twist, however, because it was extremely windy!

Some of the birds were literally being blown side-ways through the air before our eyes. It was a real trip to watch them try to stay on top of the wind currents and go where they wanted to go. Some seemed to be enjoying the wild wind (while others looked a bit harried). It was even difficult for me to hold my binoculars still at times and focus. It appeared to be high tide, and the ocean waves were lifting up their heads and crashing down all white with foam.

Despite the wind, we did see a large number of gulls, including a California Gull camped out on a log; a pair of Western Grebes, diving down for fish; a female Buffalo-Head duck, with an unusually large white patch on her cheek, in company with a few others; a Golden-Crowned Sparrow, who at one point looked like he had a mohawk because of the wind blowing up his crown feathers; and a Black Phoebe, who was blown on the wind into a patch of shrubbery when she took to the air.