Archive for the ‘Bird Images’ Category

730 Birds of North America in ONE Chart

Screen Shot 2017-06-01 at 7.01.03 AM

To zoom in and see the birds close up,

visit Co.Design Infographic

Charlotte Smith, “A Natural History of Birds” (1807)

Screen Shot 2017-05-02 at 6.30.33 PM

A Natural History of Birds

by Charlotte Smith

(1807)

birdcollage

“Byrne-Jones and his Birds”

06large

BYRNE-JONES AND HIS BIRDS 

Not everyone gets to open the Kelmskott Chaucer
on Valentine’s Day, and see the woodcuts
Byrne-Jones made of Constance, adrift in her boat,
with the seagulls wheeling over the waves,
but I did: she is looking back, over
her shoulder – her hands are clasped in prayer –
and twenty-six white birds surround her
like promises or grief.

jb

2/14
McCune Room
JFK Library
Vallejo
CA

Birds in the Bible: “like birds from Egypt, like doves” (Hosea 11:10-11)

 

Birds Can Smell

gabriellenevittFor a long time, scientists believed that birds could not smell. However, Dr. Gabrielle Nevitt conclusively proves otherwise in her research.

My specialty is olfaction – the sense of smell – and much of my research has focused on exploring how marine birds and fishes use smell in the natural environment. I have worked in areas ranging from olfactory homing in salmon, to olfactory foraging, navigation and individual recognition in birds, and in particular, petrels and albatrosses … 2016_lsh_nevittWhile most of my work has focused on the procellariiforms, I am broadly interested in the sense of smell in birds. Birds use chemical cues for a variety of behaviors, but olfaction and taste are largely ignored in behaviors from foraging to communication and sexual selection. nevittgabrielle179We were among the first groups to show odor-mediated individual recognition in birds. Long-lived Antarctic prions recognize the odor of their mates (Bonadonna and Nevitt 2004, Science) and leach’s storm-petrel chicks can recognize the individual odor signature of their nest (O’Dwyer et al. 2008). In collaboration with Henri Weimerskirch of CNRS / France, we were the first to apply high-resolution tracking to investigate the sensory basis for foraging in albatrosses. Our work shows that wandering albatross hunt by smell and can detect prey from kilometers away. (Nevitt et al. 2008, PNAS, Cover story).


BIRDS CAN SMELL
by Nancy Averett

Yet changing long-held beliefs takes time, and the scientific community is no exception. Dozens of Nevitt’s grant proposals have been rejected because of the birds-can’t-smell fallacy. A program officer once called to say her application was the worst he’d ever seen. “Your idea that birds can smell is ridiculous,”he said. “This will never be funded, so stop wasting your time.” She ignored him, and her perseverance and inventive methods have inspired others who share her fascination … Nevitt, Hagelin, and other avian olfaction trailblazers have pushed past criticism, failure, and even bodily injury in their quest to disprove one of biology’s most pervasive myths. “In science,” says Nevitt, “we rediscover the obvious sometimes.”

For more, see:

http://www.audubon.org/magazine/january-february-2014/birds-can-smell-and-one-scientist

Birds by Jacqui Dunham

Zipporah

Zipporah (from the Hebrew צִפּוֹר or tzippor) means “bird” or “sparrow.” According to the book of Exodus, she was the wife of Moses. She is celebrated in American pop culture especially in the animated film, “The Prince of Egypt,” voiced by Michelle Pfeiffer.

“16 Now the priest of Midian had seven daughters, and they came and drew water and filled the troughs to water their father’s flock. 17 The shepherds came and drove them away, but Moses stood up and saved them, and watered their flock. 18 When they came home to their father Reuel, he said, “How is it that you have come home so soon today?”19 They said, “An Egyptian delivered us out of the hand of the shepherds and even drew water for us and watered the flock.” 20 He said to his daughters, “Then where is he? Why have you left the man? Call him, that he may eat bread.” 21 And Moses was content to dwell with the man, and he gave Moses his daughter Zipporah. 22 She gave birth to a son, and he called his name Gershom, for he said, “I have been a sojourner in a foreign land.” 

Exodus 2:16-22