Archive for the ‘Bird Legends’ Category

Michael Warren’s Interview on his book _Birds in Medieval English Poetry_

The Compleat Birder

Bit of a cheat post this one, but Boydell and Brewer have recently published an interview they conducted with me on my book, Birds in Medieval English Poetry, so thought I’d share it. Click here, or simply read the text below.

Thank you for assisting our discussion of your book, Dr Warren. To begin, could you tell us a little about how you came to write this book, which is now the second in our new series Nature and Environment in the Middle Ages. What first drew you to the natural world in literature? 
When I decided to return to medieval studies after some years in teaching, it was an obvious choice for me to pursue a subject that combined a personal love of mine with literature. I knew that there was plenty to say about birds, in fact, because I’d written on this subject for my…

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Calliope Hummingbird

calliopehummingbird(female)

Calliope Hummingbirds breed in the willow thickets of coniferous woodlands in the San Gabriel Mountains between May and August, but at least one came down to the foothills near Amber Ridge this morning:  a female with a vividly spotted throat and a distinctive Calliope chitter — compared to Cornell’s Online Birding Lab recordings — sounds like no other SoCal hummer!

(Did you know that Calliope is the muse of eloquence and epic poetry?)

Did a bone vulture kill the Greek playwright Aeschylus?

As myth has it, a bone vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) did kill Aeschylus, the Ancient Greek playwright who wrote the trilogy called the Oresteia, the tragedy of Agamemnon and his family. The vulture did so by dropping a bone on his head, a bone which the bird intended to shatter so that it would be able to eat smaller pieces of it. For bone vultures, also known as lammergeiers, eat bones.

They also “paint” their white feathers red or orange, using reddish soil, but they do so secretly. The behavior appears to be instinctual and is used to assert status among the vultures, who are cousins to the much smaller Egyptian Vulture. To learn more about bone vultures, read on.

  • Thanks to ULV English major, graduating senior, and future librarian, Meredith Jones, for bringing the bone vulture to my attention!

Pelican in a Book of Hours

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Birds of Prey at Warwick Castle

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Egyptian Vulture

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Milky Eagle Owl
(young)

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Andean Condor
(10-foot wingspan!)

See part of the falconer’s display!

Andean Condors

Birds at Omi’s House

Omi's Birds

Birds and Birth, Pregnancy and Poultry

Birds and BIrth