Posts Tagged ‘Ostrich’

Birds of Safari West

Today I visited Safari West in Santa Rosa, where I had the pleasure of seeing more than 30 different species of bird from Africa and around the world, including:

  • African Lesser Flamingo, African Spoonbill, American Flamingo, Black Swan, Blue-Crowned Pigeon, Cape Thick-Knee, Cattle Egret, Demoiselle Crane, East African Crowned Crane, Fischer’s Lovebird, Greater African Flamingo, Green Turaco, Hamerkop, Helmeted Guinea Fowl, Laughing Kookaburra, Pied Imperial Pigeon, Purple Swamphen, Ostrich, Rainbow Lorikeet, Red Junglefowl (rooster!), Sacred Ibis, Scarlet Ibis, Silvery-Cheeked Hornbill, Spur-winged Lapwing, Taveta Golden Weaver, Trumpeter Hornbill, Waldrapp Ibis, White-Bellied Stork (also called Abdim’s Stork), White-Faced Whistling Duck, White Stork, & Wood Duck

 

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Flamingoes

 

Scarlet Ibis

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Hammerkop & Sacred Ibis

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Waldrapp Ibis & White-Bellied Crane

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Damoiselle Crane

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Jane Beal,
bird-photographer

 

 

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On the Ostrich Egg

WingedWonders“The ostrich egg itself, being the largest known to humans, became a symbol of the creation, for many belief systems have the Primal Egg as the source of all things created. So also by association it became a symbol of fertility and of the hidden nature of life before it becomes visible at birth. Philo made a direct relation between this idea and the roasted egg eaten by Jews as part of the Passover meal, commemorating the Exodus from Egypt and their rebirth as a nation. It was also the rebirth of the year at springtime.

The Easter egg is a continuation of this, symbolizing the burial and resurrection of Jesus, a new birth and new creation. From the Middle Ages, church inventories mentioned placing an ostrich egg on the altar at Easter and other holy days. Today in Coptic churches this is still the practice. In the Spanish city of Burgos, in the cathedral, an ostrich egg is placed at the feet of the crucified Christ.”

Peter Watkins and Jonathan Stockland
Winged Wonders: A Celebration of Birds in Human History (p. 90)